Area guide – Costa Blanca South

20 Feb | 106 min read

Famed for the long sandy beaches and hidden rugged coves of the Costa Blanca, Alicante is also home to a rich, ancient history, friendly people and unspoiled rural villages.

A near perfect climate will keep you on the beaches all year round but look a little further afield and you will find medieval ruins, diverse landscapes and thriving towns.

Set on the eastern Mediterranean coast of Spain, Alicante province is home to the Costa Blanca, 160 kilometres of stunning beaches. You’ll find some of Spain’s most famous resorts here. Glorious sandy white beaches of the south turn into characterful coves and limestone crags further north. All come with a reliable climate all year round; winters are warm and dry, the summers hot, but thankfully a shade cooler than in the southern provinces.

Inland the landscape offers just as much variety, from the rugged mountain terrain of the north to the fertile plains of the south where you’ll find lemon groves and colourful salt lakes, perfect if you are seeking a little seclusion.

This is a region steeped in history and culture. There are Roman ruins to discover and dozens of castles dotted across the countryside, once part of a fortified border between the ancient kingdoms of Castilla and Aragon. And over the city of Alicante itself, the Castle of Santa Barbara looks down on the ancient harbour and is surrounded by streets and houses that are reminders of the region’s Arabic heritage.

Alicante is well served by its tourism industry which forms the largest part of the economy and offers the most job opportunities. Traditional Spanish trades also still thrive, including agriculture, vineyards and fishing – as the miles of striking nets strung out along the coast prove.

There is a lively community of international residents – the largest ratio of expats to Spanish in the country, with some areas at fifty percent. You’ll find a warm welcome in this community, along with reliable services to support you wherever you choose to settle.

The Costa Blanca is a place of two halves, with the Northern areas offering a little more tranquillity, but a higher cost of living, and the Southern towns attracting more Northern European tourism, resulting in bustling resorts.

The major centres on the Costa Blanca have comprehensive transport networks, within the cities and between them, but in the smaller towns, you’ll need a car.

Alicante is the best-placed airport for travel abroad, and like any major city, offers a variety of destinations and price points for the budget conscious. The working day is often seasonal, with later opening hours over the summer months, and many businesses still close during traditional siesta hours.

Many of the towns in the Costa Blanca have thriving markets, sports facilities and nearby beaches. Most centre around nightlife yet remain incredibly family friendly. Golf is the reigning sport, with over 30 courses to choose from in the area.

The Costa Blanca offers a life filled with fresh food, stacks of sunshine and relaxation. Just don’t forget your sun-cream.

 

Guide to towns on Costa Blanca south (Alicante province)

In this Order: Alicante city, Gran Alacant, Torrevieja, Ciudad Quesada, Cabo Roig, Playa Flamenca, Santa Pola, Arenales Del Sol, Guardamar Del Segura, Orihuela Costa, Orihuela, La Zenia, Campoamor, Pilar de la Horadada, Torre de la Horadada, Rojales, Benijófar, Algorfa, Punta Prima, Elche.

 

Alicante city

A historic location with all the amenities you’d expect from a modern city, in Alicante you’ll find the right mix of beach, city and nightlife.

Alicante is the arrival point for most people arriving in the Costa Blanca. Those in the know don’t want to leave. You’ll find busy beaches big enough to find your own spot and a twisty turny old town where you can gaze on the gorgeous gothic architecture.

Climb the imposing Castillo de Santa Bárbara, a medieval fortress that appears to be carved out of the mountain itself and you’ll immediately appreciate the full spectacle of Alicante. Laid out below you are the large natural harbour, an elegant palm lined promenade and the narrow and the shady streets of the old town, Barrio de la Santa Cruz.

You’ll find all kinds of life here, from parties of excited tourists to culture vultures in search of a rare Picasso at the contemporary art gallery. This is the city that began the tourist boom on the Costa Blanca, and it has reaped the rewards without losing sight of its own, classically Spanish identity.

Community

As well as having the region’s busiest airport, Alicante also has a bustling port, something reflected in its ever-changing social mix. In this medium sized city of 330,000 people you’ll be mixing with people from the UK, Europe and as far afield as South America and Russia.

Property

Whatever you seek, you will find in Alicante. For beach living head to the north of the city and the San Juan beach with its mixture of high- and low-rise apartment complexes and luxury villas. For a touch of classic Alicante, townhouses and apartments can be found in the colourful buildings and sandstone blocks of the old town.

Transport

One of the busiest airports in Spain will connect you with locations all over the world, while ferries leave daily for the Balearics and south to Algeria. If you just want to get around the region the city is excellently served by train, tram and bus services.

Health

You’ll find a range of health care providers here, including three public health hospitals with emergency rooms and many more private and specialist clinics.

Amenities

Shopping is excellent in Alicante. As well as the usual hypermarket’s, there are excellent boutiques, speciality shops and regular street markets. The city is something of a sports destination and is home to two 18-hole golf courses, an athletics stadium and municipal sports arena. Along the beaches you can make use of volleyball facilities or take part in a multitude of water sport opportunities.

Living costs

This is a great place to settle if you want to enjoy all the benefits of living in a cosmopolitan Spanish city but don’t want to pay the high prices you’d expect in somewhere like Barcelona.

See all our properties for sale in Alicante city

Gran Alacant

A relaxed community feel greets you in Gran Alacant, perfect for anyone who wants to make the most of this beautiful stretch of coast and surrounding countryside.

There is a sense as soon as you arrive in the town of Gran Alacant that they’ve got things just right here. This collection of modern urbanisations is the perfect mixture of a Spanish seaside town and a relaxed residential environment. Attractive, unobtrusive properties fit into the stunning natural surroundings, including 4 kilometres of Blue Flag certified beach, sand dunes, salt marshes and a nature reserve where you can get lost amid the area’s unique flora and fauna.

With Alicante airport just 10 minutes away, Gran Alacant has long been attractive proposition for both foreign buyers and Spanish second home owners. As this isn’t really a tourist resort, the emphasis is on the people who live here all year round; care has been taken not to overpopulate the area. Residents are served by a remarkable range of facilities including a superb shopping centre and water sports club. You’re also next to Santa Pola, home to the largest fishing fleet in the Mediterranean – and that means the freshest fish in the region at your table.

Community

You’ll be living in a community of around 10,000 people, evenly split between Spanish and expats from across the world. Many people consider Gran Alacant a suburb of nearby Santa Pola, but as time goes by the town is developing its own distinct character.

Property

Since the first development began at Gran Alacant, over 25 new urbanisations have followed. Today you will find houses with great views of the sea in the upper section, while the flatter lower area offers easy access to the beach and local amenities. There is something to suit most budgets, from villas to town houses – with a conspicuous lack of high rises.

Amenities

All your retail needs are catered for thanks to the excellent shopping centre and all the usual supermarkets. Gran Alacant also has its own town hall, post office, police station, hairdressers and a weekly market where you can pick up locally produced, organic produce. The reliable, high speed internet here is better than in some parts of nearby Alicante.

Transport

Alicante airport and train station close by, you are well connected in Gran Alacant. Closer to home there is a reliable bus service to surrounding towns, as well as a more local tourist bus delivering you to and from the beach.

Health

The town has its own public health centre, along with a dentist and pharmacy. If you need to access emergency assistance there’s a 24 hour Urgencia (Accident and Emergency) in neighbouring Santa Pola and a hospital in Elche.

Cost of Living

It is possible to live within a modest budget in Gran Alacant, thanks to the range of supermarkets and reasonably priced amenities. The local market also offers great value, particularly if you are willing to haggle!

See all our properties for sale in Gran Alacant

Torrevieja

Beautiful natural surroundings, year-round sun and a thriving social scene make Torrevieja one of the most popular expat destinations in Spain.

Today it’s a thriving coastal resort, but until the 1980s Torrevieja was built on salt. The town is surrounded by two vividly coloured salt water lakes which were once the most important salt works in Europe. This natural resource was sent as far afield as Cuba; from there exporters returned with music, which is still celebrated in the Habaneras festival every year. You can now visit the lakes as part of a breathtaking nature reserve that is a great place to see the region’s bird life and visit the salt museum on the quayside to find out about their history.

Torrevieja has since quadrupled its population and now stands at 105,000. Despite this rapid growth and an influx of international inhabitants, you will find a friendly and welcoming city which still manages to retain a distinctly ‘Spanish’ atmosphere.

With five blue flag beaches in town, served by numerous restaurants and bars along with more secluded spots in which to while away the days you won’t find much to rival Torrevieja on the Costa Blanca.

Winters are warm and summers are hot in Torrevieja, so for respite you might consider taking a stroll along the impressive Paseo de la Dique de Levante. This 1.5-kilometre-long breakwater in the harbour stretches out across a wooden boardwalk and offers soothing breezes in the summer heat.

Property

The town, and particularly the surrounding developments have much more to offer than hotels and high-rises, offering plenty of alternatives including smaller apartment complexes, bungalows and whitewashed villas.

Health

If you are coming to the area for the health benefits, unfortunately the restorative effects of the pretty pink salt lake is now forbidden. However excellent health care facilities abound locally, including a brand new Spanish National Health hospital and a variety of public and private health centres.

Cost of Living

Things are a little cheaper here than the average Spanish, and your grocery basket will cost about the same as if you were living up the coast in Valencia, although property is generally a lot cheaper in Torrevieja.

Amenities

Everything you need is in Torrevieja including banks, a town hall and leisure centres. There are plentiful shopping opportunities at the local shopping mall or grab a bargain at one of the largest street markets in Spain every Friday morning.

Transport

You will be within easy reach of the two local airports at Alicante and Murcia via the N-332 which runs through the centre of town. If you’re without transport, local buses have regular daily services to most major local towns and airports. Best of all, bus travel is free in town for residents holding a citizen card, or Tarjeta Cuidadano, which also gives you access to some superb local museums and galleries.

See all our properties for sale in Torrevieja

Ciudad Quesada

Within touching distance of some of the best beaches on the Costa Blanca, Ciudad Quesada is a convenient modern town with an international flavour.

Golfers, nature lovers and sun seekers will find plenty to make them happy, with prices that put the Costa Blanca dream within reach.

Perfectly situated for access to the major attractions on the southern part of the Costa Blanca, Ciudad Quesada is built on a hill with views across the coast and the salt lakes of nearby Torrevieja.

What was once a housing development has grown into a thriving community of people attracted by its location and local facilities including an 18-hole golf course and water park. You’ll find a town with a lively centre full of internationally flavoured restaurants and bars.

A walk to a major golf course, a ten-minute drive to several blue flag beaches and within easy reach of gorgeous surrounding countryside, there’s so much for you to discover in Ciudad Quesada. Most unique are the two vividly coloured salt water lakes, which now form part of a breathtaking nature reserve that is a great place to see the region’s bird life.

Winters are warm and summers are hot in this part of Spain. You’ll be basking in temperatures that average a very comfortable 20 degrees, which means you’ll be able to make the most of this superb location all year round.

Community

Ciudad Quesada is unusual for an urbanization, in that it has become more than just a selection of streets and developed a sense of community with a lively centre. Among the people you will meet are British, Irish, Dutch, Swedish, French and Germans. An estimated sixty percent of the town’s sixteen thousand residents are expats.

Property

The housing stock is one of the great attractions of the area. There are plentiful apartments and family villas, many with pools and some at very affordable prices. At the other end of the spectrum are luxury villas and gated communities. You’ll find it a very tempting alternative to the pricier alternatives along the nearby coast.

Health

The town now has its own dedicated health centre, with others located in nearby Rojales. It’s a ten-minute drive to the excellent facilities in Torrevieja, including a brand new Spanish National Health hospital.

Amenities

What was once a small housing development has developed into a full-blown town, and the Spanish government have recognised this by building a town hall. You will find a variety of grocery shops, restaurants, a leisure centre and golf course.

Transport

You’re in easy reach of the two local airports of Alicante and Murcia. If you’re without transport, there is a bus service to most nearby towns including Rojales where you’ll find more connections via road and rail around the region.

Cost of Living

With property cheaper than some of the locations along the coast, it’s possible to live modestly but still enjoy the good life offered by the Costa Blanca.

See all our properties for sale in Ciudad Quesada

Cabo Roig

You’re never far from the delights of the sea in Cabo Roig. With desirable properties and an established expat community, this is one of the best resort towns on the Costa Blanca.

The historic 16th century watchtower that once kept watch over Berber pirate attacks is now an eye-catching landmark for one of the first developed parts of the Orihuela Costa urbanisation. In Cabo Roig you’ll find an attractive 1970s look to much of a town that is designed around the needs of its many inhabitants. First and foremost are two beautiful white sandy beaches with Blue Flag credentials, beach bars, restaurants, a wooden walkway and one of the glitziest marinas on the Costa Blanca.

Head further into town to enjoy the delights of ‘the strip’, Cabo Roig’s entertainment heart, with enough bars, restaurants and cafes to keep you fed and watered all year round. And on the rocky cliff top you can stop and admire the blue waters or take a stroll along the coastal path to the neighbouring towns that form the rest of Orihuela Costa.

Community

Official figures put the population at just 700 but you’ll actually find many more people living here, particularly in summer, when the town swells to six times that number. Cabo Roig is home to a largely expat community of northern Europeans and you will meet a friendly mixture of British, Irish, German, French and Scandinavian residents.

Property

The majority of the housing stock is low rise and you’ll find a large number of small detached chalets with gardens to choose from. At the southern end of town there are a number of gated apartment complexes and villas to explore.

Amenities

Although most of the buildings here are residential there is a fantastic choice of restaurants and bars on the main strip. If you’re looking for shops, there are a couple of supermarkets in town and a Thursday street market. For everything else head for Zenia Boulevard, a substantial mall that is just a few minutes’ drive away.

Transport

You’re conveniently linked to the rest of the Costa Blanca by the N-332 that runs through the town centre, with Murcia airport 20 minutes’ drive to the south and Alicante to the north this is a fantastic place for second homeowners.

Health

Cabo Roig is officially recommended by the World Health Organisation thanks to an enriching microclimate created by the nearby salt lakes; particularly good for people with breathing difficulties and aches and pains. You’ll find a small public health centre in neighbouring Aguamarina with larger facilities in nearby Torrevieja.

Cost of Living

As you’d expect from an upscale resort town, prices are a little higher here than in resorts like Torrevieja. However there are plentiful shopping centres and local markets within easy distance, so it’s very possible to keep your living costs down.

See all our properties for sale in Cabo Roig

Playa Flamenca

Playa Flamenca is a multicultural town that’s welcoming to newcomers. There’s plenty of sunshine, an easily accessible beach and you are well situated to explore the southern Costa Blanca.

In 1972 a group of Flemish investors turned what was a barren coastal spot into the flat, sandy Blue Flag beach resort of Playa Flamenca. It’s a small, laidback locale comprising a stretch of sand bordered by rocky coves, backed by a large, modern commercial centre.  Further inland, the urbanised areas La Florida and Via Park have now surrounded it and connected it to popular leisure resorts like Villamartin and Zenia.

Playa Flamenca has a subtropical climate with an average of 325 days of sunshine. This means that the summers are busy with throngs of tourists but residents in the quieter, winter months can still live a wonderful al fresco life. There are three championship level golf courses surrounding Playa Flamenca, including the world famous La Manga and La Finca clubs.

There is a weekend market that draws crowds from miles around – selling everything from leather goods to local produce. The town has carefully maintained its coastal walks and a short drive will bring you to the salt lakes near Torrevieja and La Mata. Take a curative mud dip or walk around the impressive Torrelamata nature reserve.  For people seeking some Spanish authenticity, the nearby city of Orihuela has a high proportion of heritage buildings and plenty of traditional tapas on offer.

Community

Playa Flamenca has a multicultural community. People are drawn here from all northern European countries, but everyone tends to use English as a common language. It’s a flat landscape and is easy to walk around, so it attracts retirees and young families.

Property

The urbanisations surrounding Playa Flamenca have gated communities with communal pools and gardens. You may find apartments, townhouses, quad houses and detached villas with private pools and gardens.

Amenities

The shopping centre in Playa Flamenca has a few bars, restaurants and shops. A police headquarters is just across the road from the beach. Nearby Zenia Boulevard has over 200 shops and boutiques and supermarkets.

Transport  

You can reach Playa Flamenca from Alicante Airport via the N-332 or AP-7 roads. There is a Costa Azul coach directly from the airport to the resort. Although Murcia International airport is closer to the town centre, you need to hire a private taxi or a car to get there.

Health

The closest healthcare from the beach is the Swedish ScandClinic Svenska Läkare. Just five minutes away from Playa Flamenca is the Health Center Orihuela Costa.  The closest hospitals are in Campoamor or Torrevieja.

Cost of Living

Property prices in Playa Flamenca are lower than in the northern Costas.  Living a healthy lifestyle is easily affordable which attracts a large number of Northern Europeans.

See all our properties for sale in Playa Flamenca

Santa Pola

There’s a reason why the Spanish choose to holiday in this beautiful fishing village, with its stunning scenery, plentiful seafood and an easy-going way of life.

Santa Pola is a charming fishing village, now renowned as an attractive coastal resort. Located on the Costa Blanca, Santa Pola enjoys a glorious Mediterranean climate of mild winters, and hot, dry summers.  The climate is ideal for exploring the 11 kilometres of beautiful beaches – many of which have the coveted blue flag status. This stunning coastline has picturesque white coves and breathtaking views of the mountains and nearby salt marshes.

With history dating back to the Roman period, Santa Pola has many historical sites, such as Santa Pola Castle, an old fortress located in the centre of the town. If you want to travel even further back in time, head to the Cueva de las Aranas, a group of caves featuring iron-age paintings.

The fishing port in Santa Pola is one of the largest on the Costa Blanca, which means fresh fish arrive daily, sometimes even being sold straight from the boats they were caught on. At the weekday fish market, you can find a huge variety of fresh fish and seafood. Look out for red prawns – the town’s speciality.

When you’ve finished browsing, go and sample the catch of the day at one of the excellent seafood restaurants in the area.

Community

Santa Pola is popular with international buyers, who comprise around half of the property market here. There is a large English-speaking expat community in the suburb of Gran Alacant, a large hillside urbanisation close to the sea.

Property

This is a popular area with many of the beautiful beach-front apartments having spectacular sea views. Venture inland and there are a selection of villas, bungalows, and townhouses. Whatever you choose, you’ll get a lot of property for your money.

Amenities

Santa Pola has a market which is open most days of the week; including its fish market, which is one of the most famous in the region. Head to the Polomax shopping centre for a spot of browsing or perhaps watch a film at the Cines Axion cinema. Venture out of the city to the Gran Alacant urbanisation where you can find many supermarkets, shops and plenty of restaurants. There is also a large selection of sports on offer in the area – from watersports such as windsurfing, paragliding, surfing, diving and swimming – to cycling, hiking and fishing.

Transport

There is no train station in Santa Pola but it’s well connected by bus, with services running to Alicante, Bilbao, and Madrid. You are only 15 minutes away from the El Altet Airport in Alicante, the fifth busiest airport in Spain. By car you are well connected to most of the large coastal cities via the AP-7 (toll motorway) and A7 (toll free highway).

Health

You’ll find English-speaking doctors in the Quirónsalud Santa Pola Medical Center and also at the Salvum Clinic in nearby Gran Alacant (both private). For public healthcare, head to the Centro de Salud Santa Pola.

Cost of Living

Its good value for money living in Santa Pola, property is very reasonably priced, public transport is very cheap and eating out is affordable and excellent quality.

See all our properties for sale in Santa Pola

Arenales Del Sol

Situated just 15 minutes from Alicante’s huge international airport, Los Arenales Del Sol is a beautiful, quiet, blue flagged beach town.

Built in the 1980’s and 1990’s, this is a new town filled with smart apartments and villas set around the Paseo Maritimo. This tiled promenade has a pedestrian walkway, bike lane and road and is busy with cafes, bars and restaurants.

To get to the beach, you need to traverse the long wooden boardwalk over a flat plain of scrubland. This is part of the Clot de Galvany Nature Reserve, a massive area of salt marsh and dunes that lies between Los Arenales Del Sol and Gran Alacant, home to rare species of plants, birds and animals. The beach itself is a nearly 3 kilometres long stretch of fine, white sand and it slopes out so gently that you need to wade 50 metres before it’s deep enough for swimming.

This has led to the growth of a windsurfing community, with rentals and classes available for beginners. It’s also popular with young families with an inflatable obstacle course set up to keep the younger ones occupied. The path connecting the beach to neighbouring El Carabassi is used by walkers, cyclists and skaters. Both the cities of Elche and Alicante are under 30 minutes drive away.

Community 

Los Arenales Del Sol is a favourite place for Spanish and British families to own second homes due to the proximity of the airport.

Property

There are several small developments consisting of apartments plus rows of detached villas with sizeable gardens. They have all the mod cons and excellent shared amenities.

Amenities

There is a small collection of high street businesses and a street market on Tuesday and Friday afternoons.

Transport

Alicante airport is under a 15 minute drive and there is a bus service linking Los Arenales Del Sol with Elche, Alicante and Santa Pola running every 30 minutes.

Health

Both the Consultorio Medico L’Altet and Consultorio de Verano Urbanova are in nearby urbanisations. The Hospital IMED Elche is open 24 hours.

Cost of Living

The homes in Los Arenales Del Sol are mostly quite small, but competitively priced apartments. The resorts in the south of the Costa Blanca tends to be less expensive than in the north.

See all our properties for sale in Arenales Del Sol

Guardamar Del Segura

80% of the land along this coast is protected. The resorts are beautiful, clean and charming – providing the communities with a host of amenities and spectacular events.

Guardamar del Segura is a wild strip of golden coastal land buttressed by sandy dunes planted with 800 hectares of pine forests with Santa Pola to the North and Torrevieja to the South. North of the mouth of the River Segura is Els Tossals Beach, an almost 2 km long naturist beach. The Southern beaches are a mix of wild, natural sands, and urbanised shores lining built up strips, where you can find bars, restaurants and shops.

The La Mata Lagoon Natural Park has a large saltwater lake with its own population of migrating flamingos. The Guardamar Pine Forest is one of the most spectacular coastal woodlands in Spain. The Reina Sofia Park forms part of that pine forest, a short walk from the Town Hall Square. It has ponds, spacious children’s playgrounds, popular “petanque” bowling pitches and walking or cycling tracks. On summer evenings, the Auditorium of the Park hosts shows and music entertainment in ‘Les Nits d’Estiu’ (The Summer Nights).

Guardamar is a clean, modern town with brilliant services, amenities and facilities. The town’s agricultural and fishing heritage are evident in the high quality of the local cuisine with many of the restaurants favouring locally grown and sourced products. There is a ‘Guardamar King Prawn (Llagostí) and Sweet Dried Red Pepper (Ñoras) Cuisine Week’ held the first week of June. Started in 2005, it has become a prestigious epicurean highlight. In February, Carnival celebrates costumes and masks with a grand ball and costume competition. At summer equinox, a ‘Foguera’ (bonfire) made of papier maché, cardboard and wood is set alight. In its glow, residents critique the year’s local and global events. On the eve of Saint John, they hold a magical ritual night of fire and water on the beach known as ‘La Nit Màgica’. The parades during the Moors and Christians week are also sensational.

Property

International buyers make up nearly 50% of the property market in Guardamar del Segura. By far the most available dwellings are flats, apartments and duplexes. However, it’s also possible to buy a bungalow, townhouse or villa reasonably close to the shore without parting with more than €200,000.

Transport

Located 20 minutes from the Alicante International airport and 30 minutes from the Murcia Airport In San Javier, Guardamar Del Segura is also serviced by the coastal N-332 highway. There are busses and coaches connecting major cities and a shuttle bus to and from Benidorm. Two bus routes connect the residential areas but the services vary by season.

Health

There is no shortage of medical assistance in the Guardamar del Segura region. Most are situated to the south of the river but the entire area hosts plenty of doctor and dentist surgeries. Surrounded by larger conurbations, there are plenty of hospitals too, with Elche, Torrevieja, and Orihuela providing close by assistance and Murcia and Alicante just a short drive away.

Living expenses

The good news is, nearly everything in this region is cheaper: groceries, housing and transport especially. However, the euro makes the cost of clothes and entertainment only just lower than the rest of Europe.

See all our properties for sale in Guardamar del Segura

Orihuela Costa

With about 320 days of sunshine, it’s the most popular stretch of the Costa Blanca. With leisure harbours, golf courses, a shopping centre and a variety of tempting restaurants.

The Orihuela Costa stretches in a triangle from the city of Orihuela to the 16 kilometres of coastline panning the Mediterranean. The varied landscape combines sierras, orchards and palm groves, but it’s the succession of resort towns, rocky headlands and sandy coves that have made it popular with tourists. Many of the resorts have disabled facilities (like the lifts up the seawall surrounding Punta Prima), kid’s playgrounds and a range of sports amenities, making the area attractive to people at all stages of life, from young families to retirees.

Popular areas include Playa De Punta Prima, Playa Flamenca, La Zenia, Cabo Roig, Campoamor, Playa Mil Palmeras, Pilar de la Horadada and Torrevieja. There’s plenty of variation; Campoamor is a resort with a leisure harbour whereas the Playa Flamenco has a string of white sandy coves with shallow paddling flats. Pilar de la Horadada combines a quiet old town with beaches and a marina at Torre de la Horadada. Originally a salt-mining centre, Torrevieja is now a bustling metropolis and one of the fastest growing cities in Spain.

Coastal walking and cycling paths run through the nearby pine woods and protected sand dunes. You’re never far from the popular La Zenia Boulevard shopping centre and a lively strip of restaurants and bars. The rich cultural and historical past of Orihuela has left a large number of monuments including Romanesque, Gothic and Renaissance churches, convents and palaces. Sports include golfing, water sports, horse riding and tennis. The diet in Orihuela is a healthy Mediterranean one rich in fish, vegetables, olive oil, rice and fruit. The local Jalon valley produces a very fine Moscatel wine.

Property

It’s home to the Costa Blanca’s best value beach properties, from apartments, duplexes and quads to townhouses. Budget a little more for a two-bedroom apartment or a townhouse near the beach or head just a five-minute drive inland to pay slightly less.

Transport

Visitors to Orihuela generally use the busier Alicante airport but Murcia is closer. There are no coastal stops but trains frequent Orihuela station. Tourists are so important to the town that there have been some large-scale improvements in public transport in the last decade. A network of bus routes connecting the capital with the rest of the region and the resorts with one another, including one linking all the beaches with the Torrevieja Hospital run to a regular timetable. There are taxi ranks in the Campomar and Playa Flamenca resorts and of course, there are cycle paths that connect most of the beaches.

Health

There are plenty of healthcare options along this coast. From doctors to dentists, there are a plethora of choices on offer, some even specialising in Northern European languages like Swedish, English and German. There is a smaller hospital in Cabo Roig and a large University hospital in Torrevieja.

Living expenses

House prices in the region vary depending on the resort you choose but offer good value in comparison to other Costas. General groceries and amenities are in line with the rest of Spain but there’s a wide range of budgetary options for socialising and travelling — with no need for running a car.

See all our properties for sale in Orihuela Costa

Orihuela

This is a city that will suit people seeking a connection between the region’s rich heritage and its present reality, surrounded by architectural riches and ancient landscapes.

If you are looking for the ‘real’ Spain but want to remain within striking distance of the Costa Blanca, it’s hard to think of a better location than Orihuela. Not to be confused with the development of the same name on the coast, this is a city with deep, fascinating Roman and Medieval roots. The largely Spanish population are rightly proud of their heritage which you’ll be able to enjoy, along with the rest of the city, during the summer fiesta or at the winter medieval market in January.

Easily navigable by foot, with a river running through the town centre, it’s easy to get lost in the past, whether you’re visiting the castle, the Cathedral’s religious art museum with great works by the likes of Velázquez or exploring the remarkable palmeral park: a thousand year old palm grove. And when you’re culturally enriched, there’s rich Arabic influenced cuisine to indulge in. At night visit one of the many tapas bars, take in a show at the Teatro Circo or enjoy the city’s grand old Casino.

Community

The city of Orihuela has a population of around 30,000. Perhaps because of its distance from the coast, the majority of the residents are Spanish, making this a great opportunity to really immerse yourself in the local community.

Property

Whether you want a townhouse steeped in history or a reasonably priced apartment, all are within easy access to the city’s amenities and attractions. More spacious, modern detached properties are to be found on the outskirts.

Amenities

A working city, Orihuela has numerous shops, a mall, banks and sporting facilities. On Tuesday or Saturday, head into town for the bustling morning market.

Transport

The nearest major city is in Murcia, a 30-minute drive away. If you arrive in the region by air it will likely be at San Javier or Altet Airport in Alicante city, both under an hour away. There are bus links plus you can come and go via the train station which is in walking distance of the historical centre.

Health

You’ll find a useful network of health facilities, including a public hospital on the east of town with emergency facilities 24-hours a day.

Cost of Living

The famous local poet Miguel Hernández is most famous for his verse Onion Lullaby, written after he discovered his wife and family were surviving on bread and onions. Even if your budget is modest, you will be able to afford quite a bit more in this reasonably priced city!

See all our properties for sale in Orihuela

La Zenia

This friendly town is small enough for a sense of community to develop around the well serviced beaches, town centre and enormous shopping centre.

La Zenia fills less than one square kilometre of land. Despite that, the town boasts the largest shopping centre in the Alicante province. With 150 shops from around the globe, squares with public fountains for the kids to splash in and plenty of live concerts and events, it draws visitors from the entire region. The Playa Zenia has a blue flag award for its services and cleanliness. The Cala Bosque and Cala Cerrada beaches are also busy, especially over the summer months, with beachside bars and restaurants, water sports and bathers.

The CDM Orihuela Costa Sports Centre has state-of-the-art leisure centre facilities for sports enthusiasts and Paddy’s Point bar is renowned for its lively atmosphere and live music. La Zenia is near the cities of Murcia, Cartagena and Alicante and the well-known golfing resorts of Villamartin, Campoamor and Las Ramblas. Nearby Torrevieja has the Parque Natural de Torrevieja, made up of two lakes lined with boardwalks so you can cycle or walk around without damaging the habitat of the many birds and animals who make it their home — including the fuschia-pink flamingos. The local Jalon valley produces red Mistela wine and sweet, white Moscatel dessert wine; there are regional pastries and even ice cream made from almonds to delight the senses.

Community

La Zenia may be small but it’s an easy-going, family-friendly resort with everything you could need within walking distance. It’s incredibly popular with UK visitors, attracting English, Scottish and Irish émigrés. Northern Europeans and Spanish residents use English as their common language.

Property

Apart from the hotel La Zenia, the coastal plots are filled with luxury villas, with un-uninterrupted views of the Mediterranean. If you travel further inland, you will find more affordable apartments.

Amenities

This is a town with everything you need on tap. You can find a pharmacy, bank and supermarket in town and the shopping centre has hundreds of options for shoppers.

Transport

Close to both Alicante and Murcia airports, you can travel to La Zenia along the A-7 coastal highway (which is a toll road).  Public transport offers an inexpensive alternative to running a car and the bus network is extensive. The Costa Azul App has bus timetables and information available but essentially, there are two routes: the Pink and the Aqua lines – both run 7 days a week.

Health

The nearest medical centre is in Cabo Roig, which is a 25-minute walk (or 4 minute drive) South of La Zenia. The closest hospital is in San Miguel de Salinas, a 5 minute car journey, and you can catch a bus to Torrevieja Hospital.

Cost of Living

La Zenia has plenty of low maintenance, low-cost housing options. Eating out is cheap and there’s little need to run a car, all in all making this a very affordable resort.

See all our properties for sale in La Zenia

Dehesa de Campoamor

Life at Dehesa de Campoamor is perfect for anyone who wants to enjoy the great outdoors, with beautiful beaches, glorious countryside and a healthy year-round climate.

On the Orihuela Costa, a major centre of expat life at the southern part of the Costa Blanca, Dehesa de Campoamor is popular with both expats and Spaniards for its incredible Blue Flag beaches – with three exquisitely tended sandy shores that you will be able to enjoy all year round thanks to the great weather. The delightful micro-climate, created by dazzling salt lakes and the surrounding mountains, was described by the World Health Organisation as one of the healthiest in the world.

Also adding to the general sense of well-being is an elevated coastal footpath backed by a spectacular red cliff face where you can look out to sea or take a stroll into the neighbouring town.  Look a bit further inland and you’ll discover the region’s rich flora and fauna, something that many visitors to the region miss – ancient pines, sand dunes and even pink flamingos in the lakes. The River Nacimiento is rich with plant life and a popular spot for birdwatchers. Golfers will be in seventh heaven too with three 18-hole golf courses to choose from.

Community

Dehesa de Campoamor is one of the more popular parts of the Orihuela Costa with the Spanish: 60% of the 33,000 population are native and clearly know a good thing when they see it. The remainder are expats and second home owners from the UK, Ireland, France, Russia and Scandinavia and Bulgaria – you could encounter people from hundreds of different nationalities living here!

Property

With a range of purpose-built properties, you know what you’re getting in Dehesa de Campoamor. Numerous townhouses, apartments and villas can be found in the area, with many inexpensive high-rise apartments offering fabulous views of the coast as well as more expensive luxury villas surrounding the central beach.

Amenities

A good selection of restaurants can be found around the beach, with supermarkets and a sports centre in town. Banks and other amenities can be found a short walk away in Cabo Roig, or jump in the car and head to the impressive shopping centre at La Zenia Boulevard.  Should you need to moor a yacht, there are 348 berths in the marina.

Transport

With Murcia just a fifteen-minute journey and Alicante a half hour along the fast toll road, this is the ideal location if you own a second home. Once you are here, there’s easy access around the region even without a car; a regular bus service connects you with Torrevieja and many locations beyond.

Health

The town has its own public medical centre along with a dentist and pharmacy. For anything else you’ll need to make the short journey to the hospital at Torrevieja.

Cost of Living

In Dehesa de Campoamor it is perfectly possible to live very frugally, with reasonably priced restaurants and a good range of larger shops to help keep costs down.

See all our properties for sale in Campoamor

Pilar de la Horadada

If you are looking for beautiful sandy beaches, great golf or an authentic Spanish town, Pilar de la Horadada is a lesser known gem with huge potential.

Just a few kilometres inland from one of the prettiest stretches on the Costa Blanca, this small, working town is perfect if you want to experience authentic Spanish life all year round. A lively market, excellent local cuisine and a very comfortable climate makes this a discerning spot in this popular part of southern Spain.

However you approach, whether it’s via the medieval pirate watchtower on the coast, past the monumental iron bull to the north of town or summoned by the tolling of the 19th century bell in the church, in Pilar de la Horadada you’re never far away from the deep history and culture of the region. Once an important trading station on a Roman trading route, the town is still alive with agricultural commerce trading in vegetables and flowers.

Nature lovers will find much to admire in the surrounding area. Just follow the scent of rosemary and thyme up the riverbed where you will find diverse species of wild orchids, dwarf palms and wild olive trees together with nesting water birds, wildcats and even eagles.

Community

With a population of 21,000, Pilar de la Horadada is somewhere you will quickly feel part of the community. Most of the area’s expat population is settled in the neighbouring villages and developments closer to the coast but you will still find a town which warmly welcomes new arrivals from all over the world.

Property

You’ll find a good variety, with prices that are extremely varied depending on the part of town you are interested in. The area is particularly good if you are looking for townhouses and apartments.

Amenities

In the centre you will find boutiques, food shops and banks along the main Calle Mayor. On Friday and Sunday visit the town market where you will be able to pick up locally sourced food and flowers. If shopping’s not your thing, the nearby 18 hole La Romero golf course will provide a delightful challenge.

Health

In 1986 the World Health Organisation declared the climate in the area one of the most equitable in the world. If that’s not enough to cure your ills, then there is a local public health clinic in the centre of town, with the nearest hospital in Torrevieja.

Transport

Pilar de la Horadada is well served by airports, including Murcia San Javier and Alicante, both easily accessible by road. If you are without your own transport, then there is a regular bus service connecting you with nearby towns and cities.

Living Costs

Being slightly removed from the coast but boasting a good range of shops means that you’ll be paying a little less than in the more populous seaside resorts.

See all our properties for sale in Pilar de Horadada

Torre de la Horadada

Perfect if you want to enjoy lazy days in a seaside town that retains its Spanish personality with easy access to the region’s cultural centres and unique natural surroundings.

A family resort town situated at the far southern end of Spain’s Costa Blanca, Torre de la Horadada will tick all the right boxes for anyone looking to enjoy the seaside lifestyle and have access to great amenities. Best of all you’ll get a warm welcome in a town which hasn’t suffered from excessive development. Relax in the town’s squares to enjoy life at a typically Spanish pace, enjoying tapas, cerveza or just sitting and watching the world go by.

Nature lovers will find much to admire in the surrounding area. Just follow the scent of rosemary and thyme up the riverbed where you will find diverse species of wild orchids, dwarf palms and wild olive trees together with nesting water birds, wildcats and even eagles. Closer to home on the seafront lies the historic watchtower that once provided defence against pirate raids. Today you will see just a relaxed Blue Flag beach with crystal clear waters – perfect for diving or just dipping your toes in.

Community

In Torre de la Horadada, you’ll find a town that is just as popular with the Spanish as the English and Irish expats who make up 30 percent of its 2,500 inhabitants. Unlike some towns on the Orihuela Costa, this remains a town with a strong Spanish identity.

Property

Much of the housing stock was built during the building boom at the beginning of the century and you will find a range reasonably priced modern apartments and villas. To the north and south are urbanisations which are still within walking distance of the beach.

Amenities

The recent expansion of housing brought with it a host of useful amenities including supermarkets, bars, restaurants and a marina alongside the Blue Flag beaches. Away from the coast you will also find Lo Monte, a campsite with excellent swimming pools, a spa and gym.

Transport

Torre de la Horadada is within easy reach of two airports, with Murcia just fifteen minutes’ drive south and Alicante under an hour to the north. Although public transport is limited here, the town is situated off both the coast road and the motorway, connecting you with inland towns and cities.

Health

The town has its own public medical centre plus a dentist and pharmacies. For anything else you’ll need to make the short journey to the hospitals at Torrevieja.

Cost of Living

You’ll find Torre de la Horadada is a great mid-range option, compared to some of the towns to the north. And with easy access to major shopping facilities you should be able to keep prices within budget.

See all our properties for sale in Torre de la Horadada

Rojales

Rojales has a characterful centre with great amenities and easy access to the coastline from Alicante to the Mar Menor. It’s also close to Murcia, Orihuela and Elche.

Rojales is a large town with the heart of a traditional Moorish village at its centre. Situated just inland of the coastal resorts of Guardamar del Segura and Torrevieja, it offers easy access to beaches with all the usual amenities associated with a well-populated urbanisation. The Segura river courses through the middle and the Azud stone dam not only cuts a fine figure for admiring passers-by but diverts water from the main flow into irrigation channels (first set up by the Moors in the 16th century) that feed the fertile agricultural river valley.

There is a museum offering historical exhibitions and the Casa de Las Conchas – an entire house painstakingly decorated by seashells. Up in the hills, the man made Rodeo caves: dwellings dug out of the rocks in the 18th and 20th centuries, now serve as galleries showcasing local arts and crafts. Another gallery space is located inside one of the town’s old water wells. This now defunct fresh water source is part of a duo called Gasparito Wells.

There are great cycling and walking routes around the Segura and the salt lakes of Torrelamata too. Rojales has its own 18 hole golf course and there’s another in the nearby town of Ciudad Quesada. The whole region is dotted with greens and links that draw visitors year-round and popular with golfers looking for winter sun. There are three water parks within driving distance, the closest being the Park Aquatico. Those looking to party can head up to Los Palacios, just north of the town centre, for lively bars and clubs. Those seeking al fresco nights can find just about any cuisine they could wish for around the bustling main square.

Community

Rojales has a healthy permanent population where Spanish nationals are actually in the minority. It’s popular with families and a good gateway to newcomers looking to get to know the area quickly.

Property

Homes range from apartment blocks, gated communities, modern villas and, more centrally, traditional townhouses. The cost of purchasing is relatively low by comparison to the coastal resorts and more northern Costa Blanca towns.

Amenities

Rojales has everything you might need on a daily basis; shops, supermarkets, bars, restaurants, cafes, pubs, banks, leisure clubs and a post office. There are larger shopping centres in Torrevieja, Murcia, Alicante and Elche.

Transport

Alicante Airport is the largest and closest airport (about 35 minutes drive), and you can reach Rojales from there via the Costa Azul bus service via Torrevieja. This service connects Rojales with all the beaches between Guardamar and Torrevieja.

Health

There is a 24-hour medical centre in Rojales, an outpost of the Torrevieja University Hospital. There is also a Dutch private hospital.

Cost of Living

Both property and lifestyle are excellent value in this part of Spain. Tax is generally lower but that reflects lower incomes too. Energy bills can become high if you use air conditioning and there are often community fees if you share communal spaces (like gardens or pools).

See all our properties for sale in Rojales

Benijófar

A tranquil alternative to the nearby coastal resorts of Guardamar and Torrevieja, or the urban sprawl surrounding them, this pretty pearl of a town is full of plazas and parks.

Settled by the Arabs, Benijofar’s name stems from the Arabic word Jofar, meaning ‘pearl’. There is a charming church at its centre which sits within the Plaza de la Constitución, a modernised main square. Nearby, a venue called the Casa de Cultura has a rostrum for live events from theatre to concerts. This building overlooks the north end of the Cañada Marsa Parque, the largest of three public parks in the town.

Benijofar is great for walking and cycling tours around the Path of the Rafaels, the Parc Natural del Mata y Torrevieja and the Rio Segura. Keen hikers have the nearby mountains Sierra de Orihuela and de Callosa within easy reach. The beaches of Guardamar del Segura, Torrevieja and La Mata are accessible by car in under 20 minutes. Keen swimmers can access both indoor and open-air public pools locally. The Aquapark Ciudad Quesada is a nearby water park with plenty of slides while the Lo Rufete Multiaventura Park offers quad biking, horse riding, paintballing, archery, kayaking and more. Golfers have several courses to choose from, with the famous La Finca greens closeby.

There are no hotels in Benijofar, so it’s considered a quiet town tucked away from the hubbub of the nearby seaside resorts. It has a local market on a Tuesday and plenty of international and Spanish bars and restaurants. If the local radius of Benijofar becomes too small, there are strong expat communities in the larger, more modern towns surrounding it, like Formentera del Segura, Algorfa, Ciudad Quesada and Rojales.

Community

Benijofar is relatively small by comparison to its neighbours, but it still attracts second homeowners and expatriates, giving it a multinational feel. There is a high proportion of Northern Europeans in the whole region.

Property

There are both affordable and luxury villas available in Benijofar located a little further from the centre but they offer the advantage of being detached. Closer in, you’ll find bungalows, and townhouses but, unusually, very few apartments.

Amenities

The shops bring in both British and Dutch brands with many adopting further international produce into their range. There are plenty of banks, gyms, hairdressers, pharmacies and cafes. The post office is one block behind the main square.

Transport

Reached by the AP-7 road (off the A7 coastal highway), you can get around by car very easily in Benijofar. There are international trains and flights from Alicante – Murcia International airport is close too. There is a good network of buses to major cities and the coastal resorts.

Health

By the town hall, you’ll find a state medical centre run by Torrevieja hospital which opens every day. 24-hour emergency services are available from Rojales surgery, which is a five mile drive. Medcare offers private and state medical, dental and cosmetic care for Spanish and English speakers. In addition, Torrevieja hosts a network of university hospitals.

Cost of Living

As with many of the southerly resorts of the Costa Blanca, the area is slightly cheaper than the resorts to the north of Alicante. Produce, housing, transport and healthcare services are inexpensive by comparison to Northern Europe.

See all our properties for sale in Benijófar

Algorfa

Perfectly situated in stunning countryside, Algorfa offers life in a genuine Spanish village, with access to the best of the Costa Blanca and a friendly, multinational community.

On the banks of the Segura river in the shadow of Mount Escotera and surrounded by fields filled with fragrant citrus trees, Algorfa is a village several miles inland from the southern reaches of the Costa Blanca. Here you’ll find a quiet retreat from the hustle and bustle of the coastal towns, with a mainly Spanish population in the village which mixes with the international communities of the attractive developments around its edges.

In Algorfa you will a multitude of bars, shops and restaurants together with some of the very best golf clubs on the Costa Blanca. The town is perfectly situated for accessing many Blue Flag beaches; the closest is just five miles away. This friendly pueblo offers the quiet Spanish life, though if you ever do want a little more action there are larger resort towns on your doorstep and a variety of distractions to explore, from water parks to incredible natural salt lakes and mountain walks

Community

The area has a population of around three thousand, half of whom live in the village and are mainly Spanish. You’ll find the other half who hail from elsewhere in Spain and beyond in the four nearby developments.

Property

In the village you can choose from apartments and more sizeable town houses, while there is a great range of reasonably priced villas in the surrounding urbanisations – including property on La Finca golf course.

Amenities  

Algorfa has a range of traditional tapas bars, grocery shops, a pharmacy and an optician. On Wednesdays, visit the market for local produce and clothing. For anything else you are just a few minutes’ drive from the much larger urbanisation Ciudad Quesada. There are also excellent municipal sports facilities on the west side of town including an outdoor swimming pool.

Transport  

There is no public transport in Algorfa, so you are will need a car to get around –  but you needn’t be driving for long. The nearest Blue Flag beach, at Guardamar is a quarter of an hour away, while the airports of Alicante and Murcia are also less than an hour’s drive.

Health

You’ll find a public health centre in the village as well as a pharmacy. For anything more the nearest hospital is in Torrevieja, thirty minutes away.

Cost of Living

For a small village there’s a good range of places to eat out cheaply, plus reasonably priced shops nearby. You’re likely to find that living away from the busier coast will save you some money.

See all our properties for sale in Algorfa

Punta Prima

Move here for the beautiful climate, gorgeous blue flag beach and a wealth of local amenities all within walking distance.

Punta Prima is a seaside urbanisation on the Costa Blanca, located within 30 minutes of both Murcia and Alicante airport. The Mediterranean climate means you can expect around 320 days of sunshine a year – perfect for losing many an afternoon splashing around in the warm waters of Punta Prima’s excellent blue flag beaches.

Everything you need is within walking distance as Punta Prima has a small commercial centre with a good range of shops and restaurants, not to mention banks and a gym. For larger shops, head to nearby Torrevieja, which is only ten minutes away by car. Here you will find a range of amenities including one of the largest street markets in the Costa Blanca and Las Habaneras, a large shopping centre where you will find many popular high-street brands. If it’s fun for the family you’re looking for, there are lots of options including a waterpark, cinema, ten pin bowling, marina, submarine and the beautiful beaches of Playa Flamenca. If it’s nightlife you crave, you’ll also find a range of bars, clubs, and restaurants.

For golf-lovers, there are numerous golf courses to choose from including Villamartin Golf ClubLas Ramblas Golf Club and Las Colinas Golf Club to name just a few.

Community

Punta Prima has an international community, with a large number of British expats. The area is also popular with Spanish holiday homeowners. As such, it is much busier in the summer than winter.

Property

There are plenty of beachside properties including a mixture of apartments, town houses and villas. You will also find several luxury apartments complexes in the area, many of which offer large communal gardens, swimming pools, security services and secure parking.

Amenities

You are very well situated with a range of local amenities such as shops, restaurants, bars, a gym and banks all within walking distance and all open year round.

Transport

There are good transport links in the area: buses run hourly to Torrevieja and it’s only a 30-minute drive from Murcia and Alicante airports.

Health

There are a number of medical facilities in the area, including doctors, dentists and vets. These are all within walking distance, but if it’s a hospital you need, you’re only a short drive from the Hospital Universitario in Torrevieja.

Cost of Living

You’ll find great value for money here, with lower living costs considerably less than in the UK and also other parts of Spain.

See all our properties for sale in Punta Prima

Elche

Move to this ancient city of palm groves, culture and sacred mysteries where you will find great education, good living and a close proximity to the beaches of the Costa Blanca.

Just under 20 minutes away from Alicante airport lies the ancient city of Elche. Situated seven miles inland, this historic city is often missed by tourists, who tend to head straight to the coastal resorts of the Costa Blanca. You won’t find many mentions of it in the travel section of your weekly newspaper or blog either, which is a shame, as the city is overflowing with history and culture with three sites listed in UNESCO’s World Heritage lists: the Historic Palm Grove, the Mystery Play of Elche and the Pusol School Museum.

The Historic Palm Grove is arguably the site for which Elche is best-known. This Edenesque garden of more than 200,000 palm trees is believed to have been planted by the Carthaginians around the 5th century BC and is the only one of its kind anywhere in Europe.

Elche itself is also believed to have been founded in the 5th century BC and is the site of many archaeological discoveries. These include the Lady of Elche, one of the most famous artifacts in Spain. You can view a replica in the Museo Arqueológico y de Historia de Elche which is based in the beautiful 12th century Palace of Altamira. Here, you will also be able to view a treasure trove of the city’s antiques and historical artifacts.

The city also contains more ‘intangible’ artifacts, such as the Mystery Play of Elche, a kind of spiritual and theatrical ritual, which depicts the Virgin Mary’s ascension to heaven via a 15th century contraption called a Deus ex machina (‘god from the machine’). With all its incredible culture and beauty, Elche is surely a hidden gem just begging to be discovered.

Community

Elche is an authentic Spanish city and this is reflected in its community. You will find people of various nationalities in Elche but the majority of the city’s population is comprised of native Spanish residents. Elche has one of the lowest crime rates in Alicante.

Property

There is a large range of property in the area, from modern villas, to country houses in large plots. You’ll also find city apartments and large plots of land for building your dream home.

Amenities

You’ll find everything you need in Elche with most of the neighborhoods offering shops of various kinds. However, you’ll find the widest range of shops in the city center and the popular L’Aljub Commercial Center. There are lots of bars and restaurants in the city and also cinemas, museums and theatres. The nearest beach is only a 15-minute drive from the city.

Transport

Elche has excellent transport links and is within easy reach of two international airports: Alicante and Murcia. The city has two train stations and you’ll find regular buses in the area in addition to easy motorway links to nearby Torrevieja and Cartagena.

Health

Elche has excellent healthcare including many clinics, two large public hospitals, and a private hospital.

Cost of Living

You’ll find Elche cheaper than other Spanish cities and even some of the busier tourist resorts on the Costa Blanca.

See all our properties for sale in Elche

Subscribe to the newsletter and secure the best properties!